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Dominic deLacy

“Science provides a great venue to try out ideas and not be threatened when things don’t work as first expected. A great part of the learning experience comes from the opportunity to re-visit and re-think anticipated outcomes and results.” DeLacy began his education career as a high school teacher at Westford Academy in Massachusetts before joining the technology revolution in the area of software development, specializing in student data management for 25 years. DeLacy has worked as an applied social research consultant for Bell Associates, the MBTA, Massport, and Boston Public Schools. He is an instructor and practitioner at the University of Phoenix’s MBA program where he teaches project planning and change management as well as database design. He has also taught management classes at Endicott College in Beverly, Mass., and Eastern Nazarene College, in Quincy, Mass. DeLacy holds a Master’s in Educational Management and Administration from Cambridge College and a B.A. in English from Salem State University.

Recent Posts

Many California Classrooms Slow to Adapt Science Curriculum

Jun 26, 2016 by Dominic deLacy

Despite its role as a Lead State Partner in the creation of the Next Generation Science Standards, the golden state may be falling behind on actually implementing the new standards into the California science curriculum. While the standards have been official for years, there is little evidence that they’re actually getting taught in the widespread basis required in California classrooms.

“A review of some of California’s largest school districts shows that fewer than half even mention the new science standards adopted by the state nearly two years ago in their Local Control and Accountability Plans, which they are required to draw up as a result of school reforms championed by Gov. Jerry Brown,” EdSource says. 

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Topics: STEM, curriculum, California

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